Categories
Dependency theory Economic Development Heterodox Economics Marx Publications

Samir Amin: A Pioneering Marxist and Third World Activist (new article)

I had the honor of writing a legacy piece on Samir Amin for Development and Change this year. It will be a part of the 2020 Forum issue, but is already available for download.

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Categories
Heterodox Economics Publications

New Working Paper: Heterodox Economics as a Positive Project: Revisiting the Debate

Screenshot 2019-08-01 at 20.18.02.pngI have a new working paper with Carolina Alves in the ESRC GPID Research Network Working Paper series.

Read a short blog post about the project or a long one.

Download the working paper here.

Categories
Discrimination in Economics In the media INET Publications

Diversity and Excellence: Not A Zero Sum Game

diverse-group-silhouette.jpgI recently published the post Diversity and Excellence: Not A Zero Sum Game along with colleagues for the Institute for New Economic Thinking’s (INET) blog series “Diversity and Pluralism in Economics: Problems and Solutions”.

Categories
Dependency theory Events Publications

Samir Amin’s Legacy and Relevance Today (DSA 2019 Panel)

Please consider submitting to this panel on the legacy of Samir Amin that I am co-convening with Maria Dyveke Styve (University of Bergen) and Ushehwedu Kufakurinani (University of Zimbabwe) at the Development Studies Association (DSA) conference at the Open University, Milton Keynes, June 19th to 21st 2019.

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Publications

New Working Paper: Imputing Away the Ladder?

I recently published Imputing Away the Ladder? Implications of Changes in National Accounting Standards for Assessing Inter-country Inequalities as a Working Paper with Jacob Assa with the Global Poverty and Inequality Dynamics Research Network.

Read our blog post for the GPID network here. I also summarized our arguments in a Twitter thread.

Our findings were also covered in UnHerd. You can download our data here.

Categories
Book review Dependency theory Publications

Book Review: The Global Political Economy of Raúl Prebisch

The Global Political Economy of Raúl Prebisch (Hardback) book cover

I recently published a review of The Global Political Economy of Raúl Prebisch (ed. by Matias Margulis, 2017) in the Review of Radical Political Economics. Download the review here.

Categories
Development Finance Economic Development Microfinance Publications

New paper: ‘Caveat emptor: the Graduation Approach, electronic payments and the potential pitfalls of financial inclusion’

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Paulo dos Santos and I recently published a piece in Policy in Focus 14 (2): 55-57. This is a publication by The International Policy Centre for Inclusive Growth. You can also read the piece on Developing Economics.

Categories
Dependency theory Economic Development INET Publications

New Edited Volume: Conversations on Dependency Theory

connected-world

An e-book I co-edited on dependency theory was recently published on the Institute for New Economic Thinking’s (INET) website. The e-book is the first volume of the e-book series Dialogues on Development and it includes 13 interviews with prominent scholars who have differing views on dependency theory.

Read about the e-book on INET’s website.

Download the e-book.

Download individual chapters (interviewees in brackets):

Categories
Development Finance Microfinance Publications

New article: Better than Cash, but Beware the Costs

Paulo dos Santos and I recently published Better than Cash, but Beware the Costs: Electronic Payments Systems and Financial Inclusion in Developing Economies in Development and Change. The article dissects and critically evaluates the assumptions behind the policies promoted by the Better Than Cash Alliance.

Here is the abstract:

This article considers current proposals for using electronic payments systems to promote financial inclusion — that is, to widen the availability of financial and monetary services in developing countries. While such systems can generate significant savings in the operation of monetary systems, payment services markets are typically uncompetitive and require regulatory and broader state interventions to ensure those savings are widely distributed. The use of those systems to broaden the reach of for-profit lenders raises a number of concerns, as a growing literature has documented how microcredit initiatives in developing countries have resulted primarily in expansions in consumption credit to households, often under predatory terms. The authors advance two original arguments in this connection. First, the perverse results of many microcredit initiatives reflect the underdevelopment of the areas concerned: without broader development strategies, potentially transformative productive projects are rare and unprofitable to finance. In contrast, widespread unmet consumption needs ensure consumption credit offers lenders a profitable alternative business orientation. Second, and in light of this, electronic payments platforms can contribute to economic development by enabling the establishment of well-regulated or public systems of electronic ‘narrow banks’ restricted from lending, but capable of widening access to affordable payments, savings and insurance services.

Categories
Africa Development Finance Publications

Report on Eurobonds in Sub-Saharan Africa

I recently published the report Bond to Happen? Recurring Debt Crises in Sub-Saharan Africa and the Rise of Sovereign Bond Issuance. The report assesses risks and opportunities associated with Eurobond issuance in sub-Saharan Africa. The case studies in the report expose a lack of accountability when it comes borrowing processes in a selection of sub-Saharan African countries. In fact, the process of bond issuance is often plagued by lack of transparency and ultimately legitimacy, from the perspective of the citizens of the issuing country. As this is playing out in the context of a defective framework for sovereign lending and borrowing and a flawed system for debt restructuring, issuing Eurobonds entails many serious risks.

Read some coverage of the report: