Letter in the Financial Times & an Alternative Economics Summer reading List

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Earlier this month, I published a letter in the Financial Times with Carolina Alves, Besiana Balla and Devika Dutt (July 17th, 2018). The letter was a reaction the lack of diversity in Martin Wolf’s summer reading list in the FT. His reading list consisted of only authors based in either the UK or the US, 12 out of 13 of the authors were men, and most of them were writing within the so-called mainstream of the profession. We were therefore compelled to put together our own list in order to show that heterodox, female and/or non-Western scholars also do publish high quality work – although it tends to go unnoticed due to the biases in our field. So, we put together this Alternative Economics Summer Reading List (published on Developing Economics).

It was Martin’s response (see here for the full exchange) to my comment under his list that finally inspired us to write a letter to the FT. In our letter, we urge Martin to be explicit about his biases when publishing such reading lists, as many FT readers might be misled into thinking that his lists represent the breadth of the field.

The letter went on to become the most read FT Letter of the week.

New blog: Developing Economics

Last month, I created the Developing Economics blog. This blog takes a critical approach to development economics and seeks to stimulate debate and critical reflection among academics and practitioners from all relevant fields. I decided to create this platform after noticing that although there are a lot of great blogs on heterodox economics and on international development, there is no blog devoted to the specific niche of heterodox/critical thinking on economic development.

The blog is meant to be hub for critical thinking (not just my opinions), so please get in touch should you want to contribute to the blog! Many excellent guest bloggers have already contributed.

You can also follow the blog on Twitter and like it on Facebook.

Blog post: Why Isn’t The World Bank’s Choice of Chief Economist More Controversial?

Paul

I wrote this piece for The New School Economic Review (NSER) blog.

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Blog post: How to Justify Teaching the Worst of Economics to Non-Economists

miracle-at-blackboard

In a new blog post on New School Economic Review, I discuss the challenges of teaching both orthodox and heterodox economics in one single Economics class. This blog post proceeded to go viral and has been shared on social media over 4000 times to date. Someone also translated it to Spanish.

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